LEARNING MODULE: Who We Are • Our Community

“Diversity is about all of us and about us having to figure out
how to walk through this world together.”

~ Jacqueline Woodson

Who We Are is a process to reflect on our community to learn about each other as a community — as a staff and with students. This is very important for all students including early childhood through  drawings, elementary and secondary where they can be reflective about their journey in words, phrases, drawings and other visual mediums. The process follows the Pedagogy of Confidence structure of the Pedagogical Flow Map (PFM) with Priming, Processing and Retaining for Understanding. The three modules of self discovery and discoveries together include 
1. one’s self and each other with Who Am I;,
2. their community (this section) with Who We Are; 
3. their backgrounds with Who Are My Ancestors • We Have Roots

This self discover using the National Urban Alliance 4 C’s of collaboration, critical thinking, community and creativity use several models including the cognitive language of the visual language/tools Thinking Maps®

Accompanying materials for this module:

• PowerPoint
• PDF file of the PowerPoint
Who Am I Print Version of the Guide (students can do the maps within the guide) PDF

The PowerPoint to the left can also be downloaded to your hard drive with the link above or clicking here.

The Pedagogical Flow Map
The Pedagogical Flow Map (PFM) is the structure that creates a framework for translating the Pedagogy of Confidence into lesson or unit designs.

• Priming
• Processing
• Retaining for Understanding

The PFM addresses the:

• what — the standards of the disciplines and content acquisition
• how — the standards of the disciplines and content acquisition

The PFM ensures alignment with the High Operational Practices (HOPs) of the Pedagogy of Confidence. This means that instruction will be designed around the development of cognition that leads to high operational performance.
More on The Pedagogical Flow Map

“Quote”
– Author

Stefanie Rome, Executive Director of NUA interactively models the Pedagogical Flow Map with students in a classroom setting.

•> Priming
•> Processing
•> Retaining for Understanding

Thinking Maps®
Thinking Maps®, created by David Hyerle, are consistent visual patterns linked directly to eight specific thought processes. By visualizing our thinking, we create concrete images of abstract thoughts to reach higher levels of critical and creative thinking individually and collaboratively. Thinking Maps® establish a consistent language for thinking and problem solving. The goal is to have the students work independently choosing the cognitive process of a Thinking Maps® that best supports their thinking.

The language of Thinking Maps® is a language of eight fundamental cognitive skills. The eight cognitive skills are defining in context, describing attributes, comparing and contrasting, classification, part-whole spatial reasoning, sequencing, cause and effect reasoning, and reasoning by analogy. Each of the eight processes additionally can have a Frame of Reference (the rectangle around each map) to further expand information, schema and thinking. To further thinking with the Frame of Reference, go to the Depth and Complexity page.
More on Thinking Maps®

“Our ability to reach unity in diversity will be the beauty and the test of our civilization.”
~ Mahatma Gandhi

Day 1: BrainstormingDay 2: QualitiesDay 3: SequencingDay 4: Cause / EffectDay 5: Categorization
The idea of doing the five maps in five days following a Pedagogical Flow Map pattern builds community though learning about ourselves together, while introducing the maps as a thinking language along with collaborative learning methods.

The Lessons:  Who We Are

Day 1 • First Map:  Circle Map (Thinking Maps®) for Brainstorming

“A lot of different flowers make a bouquet.”
~ Islamic Proverb

Overview
The Circle Map is for defining in context about something. For Who We Are the students will use the Circle Map to define things about our classroom community. This can include things in the classroom, routines and ways we do things in the classroom, places the class goes, and anything about our classroom. When doing the Circle Map, and any map, it is important the teacher models doing the map for themselves first as a model of thinking and doing.

On the initial use of the Circle Map, it can be with just the information above. This will be expanded to use the Frame of Reference as well. The Frame can be used to expand with details for the information about the classroom. An example is if they write we have a particular type of paper, then can add in the frame what they do with it, why or similar expansion of information or evidences. Like above, when doing the Circle Map with the Frame, and all maps and the frame, it is important the teacher models doing the map for themselves first as a model of thinking and doing.

1. Community Building with Commonalities
Participants face the inside of the circle on their individual spots. One person (start with the lead facilitator modeling several times, then each person will do it once) will state something they find important to them about our classroom community. An example might be “I like how we do math with math tiles” Then everyone who has this “In Common” with the person who stated “I like…” will leave their spots and trade with someone else. This is followed by another person sharing something true about the classroom. Then everyone who has this “In Common” with the person who stated “I like…” will leave their spots and trade with someone else.
More on Building Community Together


2. Who We Are
To develop the whole community together, building upon our drawing a drawing of oneself (and writing their name below the drawing) with Who We Are, the following will be a community effort. The students will draw a picture representing the classroom (e.g. many faces) in small groups (or the whole class on a large piece of butcher paper) and then together they will have speech bubbles on something about the class:

• in pairs on a paper
• in small groups on larger paper
• as a whole class on a large sheet of butcher paper spread out
• and/or in steps of the above

The teacher can model drawing their own face along with one or two students to model on the large butcher paper, or a paper the size for a small group (3-4).. Model thinking aloud as you do key features, and support the students and welcome them supporting you. With younger children, the use of a mirror can also be an excellent support tool.

Click on to enlarge.

Preceding the above, you can have the students do a Think-Pair-Share sharing key things that make their classroom unique and the special way it is. When doing Think-Pair-Share it is always recommended that the order of modeling is first the teacher with a student; second student-student (peer to peer modeling for the whole class); third all students paired up; followed by a whole group sharing).

3. Collaboratively Learning About Our Classroom

Click on to enlarge.

Have the students Think-Pair-Share things about the classroom. This can be things they do in the classroom, places the class goes, objects and materials in the classroom, how we do things in the classroom, and so forth. What the teacher models with the student initially will be a powerful modeling of what the possibilities are. Follow the same Think-Pair-Share format as the above priming with three things about the classroom. This is building a collaborative community, developing background knowledge and having all students involved in a student centered atmosphere. When the students are ready to ‘change up the process‘, you could have the Think-Pair-Share go from pairs to fours (see visual). 

Building Community with Commonalities
Think Pair Share – Third Grade
Think Pair Share

Circle Map (Thinking Maps®) for Brainstorming
Since this is about the classroom community, the maps will be collaborative in small groups. Draw picture of the class together in the middle. After drawing the picture and adding the classroom name (e.g. room 28), then draw a circle around the drawing and name. It is important to do the drawing and name first, then the circle so that the drawing and name fit. The educator models first with a small group of students with the whole class observing. It is recommended for both success and community to have the students do these in small groups so they can observe and communicate the ‘how-to’ together learning with one another’s gifts.

Next, with the same small group, the teacher models adding things about the classroom having all of the team (teacher and small group of students) having an equal ‘power of the pen’ (each has a writing utensil) together working collaboratively. Do not have the group draw an outer circle until they have added multiple things about the classroom. While the illustration of the map here is in words and drawings, drawings are equally good to use for emergent readers. This is important so that there is always room to add information initially. As they become more proficient with the maps, the students will proceed with estimation skills and depth of understanding with doing the maps. This includes later when the maps can also be done inductively and the frame of reference first. But that is for later — now simply proceed with information about oneself with the teacher initially modeling. Things about the classroom include

• materials;
• beliefs;
• experiences;
• people;
• objects;
• school events;
• places the class goes.

It is helpful to have students contribute ideas which could be put on a whole class Circle Map of ideas to consider when brainstorming ‘Who We Are’ ideas of information about ourselves.

Extension 
An extension that will be used later in lessons that could be incorporated now as well is adding the frame to the Circle Map. This is something that can be used on all maps. The example to the right shares how students can expand their things about themselves with details, who, how, why and where. Further information about the frame and how to use it may be found on the cultural frame of reference page, the Thinking Maps® page, the schema page and the depth and complexity page

To support the Retaining for Understanding several pathways are suggested:

• group presentations reading from the maps;
• free write;
• writing from a sentence pattern and/or free write extension expanding from the sentence frame (differentiation)

Presentations:  For beginning readers/writers especially with Pre-K and K, the students can read their maps following their images in reading. An example is they share ‘I like ice cream’; ‘I like to go fast’; and so forth. When presenting each student stands, says “Hello my name is ________” or similar, then shares two things on their Thinking Map, followed by showing the map to the whole class.

Free Write:  The students write about themselves from the information on the Circle Map. It is important the teacher model strategies of writing from their personal Circle Map with the students observing. I would then have a student do the same with the class observing (either via a projection with the student’s actual writing and/or in a fishbowl setting). Then all students write. After writing I would have students read one sentence (a ‘favorite’) from their writing to the whole class. This provides affirmations and models of success.

Sentence Frame (Patterns):  Students are provides a sentence frame to write from. Writing patterns build an understanding of sentence structure in a non-threatening manner. It is important to develop ideas through patterns, visual mapping, collaborative recitation, vocabulary building, working language with a pocket chart, and writing. It will benefit the students to use words for patterns that reflect common usage (see the list of 100 and 1000 most used words in the English language). Patterns provide models of excellence while building on the brain seeking patterns. The goal is to set the stage for successful original writing.

Some simple examples include:

I like ________.
I like ________.

I like playing ________.
I like playing ________.

To facilitate success initially model and have students ‘read’ their maps following the flow with their fingers reading their maps orally. This is similar to the reading above with presentations with the examples: they share ‘I like ice cream’; ‘I like to go fast’; and so forth. 

Class Reflection
Share the ‘tools’ we used to develop our ideas and help our presentations and writing. Some examples they will share are the Circle Map for brainstorming; Think-Pair-Share; the collaborative methods; and so forth.

Day 1: BrainstormingDay 2: QualitiesDay 3: SequencingDay 4: Cause / EffectDay 5: Categorization
The idea of doing the five maps in five days following a Pedagogical Flow Map pattern builds community though learning about ourselves together, while introducing the maps as a thinking language along with collaborative learning methods.

Day 2 – Second Map:  Bubble Map (Thinking Maps®) for Describing

“A diverse mix of voices leads to better discussions, decisions, and outcomes for everyone.”
~ Sundar Pichai

Overview
The Bubble Map which is specifically for qualities. This includes descriptive words and adjectives that describe themselves. Unlike the Circle Map that is used for brainstorming, the Bubble Map is a tool for specifically identifying qualities and characteristics and for refining the use of descriptive words. In the center circle, write the word or thing being “described.” In the outside bubbles,” write in adjectives and/or adjective phrases to describe something.

On the initial use of the Bubble Map, it can be with just the information above. This will be expanded when doing Community to use the Frame of Reference as well. The Frame can be used to expand with details for the qualities about themselves. An example is if they write they are curious, then can add in the frame an example of how they are curious and/or an expansion of information on or evidences. Like above, when doing the Bubble Map with the Frame, and all maps and the frame, it is important the teacher models doing the map for themselves first as a model of thinking and doing.

1. Community Building with Commonalities (Changing It Up with Qualities/Gifts)
Participants face the inside of the circle on their individual spots. One person (start with the lead facilitator modeling several times, then each person will do it once) will state a quality / gift of our classroom (descriptive words / adjectives). An example might be “helping”. Then everyone who feels this “In Common” with the person who stated “We are…” will leave their spots and trade with someone else. This is followed by another person sharing something true about themselves. Then everyone who has this “In Common” with the person who stated “We are…” will leave their spots and trade with someone else. Debrief the students on the purpose of this community building exercises.
More on Building Community Together

2. Who Are We Drawing and Name – Drawing Together
The teacher pairs up with a student and models drawing one another. Then have two students draw one another with the whole class observing (on a projection device or in a fishbowl setting). They can be drawn on the same paper concurrently.

3. Collaboratively Learning About One Another’s Qualities / Gifts

Click on to enlarge.

Have the students Think-Pair-Share qualities / gifts about themselves. This can be things that describe them:  kind, fast, curious, helper, athletic, and so forth. What the teacher models with the student initially will be a powerful modeling of what the possibilities are. This is building a collaborative community, developing background knowledge and having all students involved in a student centered atmosphere. When the students are ready to ‘change up the process‘, you could have the Think-Pair-Share go from pairs to fours (see visual). 

Bubble Map (Thinking Maps®) for Describing Qualities
The teacher with two students models to the whole class (in front or fishbowl setting) drawing a picture of representing the classroom. After drawing the picture and adding a name for the classroom (e.g. room 28), then draw a circle around the drawing and the class name. It is important to do the drawing and class name first, then the circle so that the drawing and name fit. Model with yours first (the educator), and two student(s) model to the whole class. It is recommended for both success and community to have the students do these in small groups so they can observe and communicate the ‘how-to’ together supporting one another.

Bubble Map (Thinking Maps®) for Describing Qualities
Teacher models with a student(s) doing a Bubble Map on qualities / gifts, each doing a Bubble Map of themselves. The teacher models eliciting ideas together, affirming the student with their ideas, acknowledging how they learn from the student. The map can be done in words and/or drawings. It is important to model writing the word or drawing the picture prior to putting a circle around it. This makes sure there is sufficient space to fit the whole word and/or drawing.

After each new quality / gift, then put a circle / oval around the writing and/or drawing. This differentiates the Bubble Map for qualities only from the Circle Map which is for brainstorming. Also draw a line from the center to each quality / gift. This could also be done with clip art or clippings (collage style) from magazines. It could also be a combination of all of the above. I would go around the classroom as students are creating their Bubble Maps and have them read their maps in complete sentences. An example would be: ‘name’ is a reader;  ‘name’ is very tall.

Extension

An extension that will be used later in lessons that could be incorporated now as well is adding the frame to the Circle Map. This is something that can be used on all maps. The example to the right shares how students can expand their things about themselves with details, who, how, why and where. Further information about the frame and how to use it may be found on the cultural frame of reference page, Thinking Maps® page, the schema page and the depth and understanding page. 

 

To support the Retaining for Understanding several pathways are suggested:

• individual oral presentations reading from the maps;
• free write
• writing from a sentence pattern and/or free write extension expanding from the sentence frame (differentiation)

Presentations:  For beginning readers/writers especially with pre-k and K, the students can read their maps following their images in reading. An example is they share ‘I like ice cream’; ‘I like to go fast’; and so forth. When presenting each student stands, says “Hello my name is ________” or similar, then shares two things on their Thinking Map, followed by showing the map to the whole class.

Free Write:  The students write about themselves from the information on the Bubble Map for qualities. It is important the teacher model strategies of writing from their personal Bubble Map for qualities with the students observing. I would then have a student do the same with the class observing (either via a projection with the student’s actual writing and/or in a fishbowl setting). Then all students write. After writing I would have students read one sentence (a ‘favorite’) from their writing to the whole class. This provides affirmations and models of success.


Sentence Frame (Patterns):
 Students are provides a sentence frame to write from. Writing patterns build an understanding of sentence structure in a non-threatening manner. It is important to develop ideas through patterns, visual mapping, collaborative recitation, vocabulary building, working language with a pocket chart, and writing. It will benefit the students to use words for patterns that reflect common usage (see the list of 100 and 1000 most used words in the English language). Patterns provide models of excellence while building on the brain seeking patterns. The goal is to set the stage for successful original writing.

Some simple examples include:

I am ________.
I am ________.

I am  ________ like a ________.
I am  ________ like a ________.

To facilitate success initially model and have students ‘read’ their maps following the flow with their fingers reading their maps orally. This is similar to the reading above with presentations with the examples: they share ‘I like ice cream’; ‘I like to go fast’; and so forth. 

Class Reflection
Share the ‘tools’ we used to develop our ideas and help our presentations and writing. Some examples they will share are the Bubble Map for qualities; Think-Pair-Share; the collaborative methods; and so forth.

Day 1: BrainstormingDay 2: QualitiesDay 3: SequencingDay 4: Cause / EffectDay 5: Categorization
The idea of doing the five maps in five days following a Pedagogical Flow Map pattern builds community though learning about ourselves together, while introducing the maps as a thinking language along with collaborative learning methods.

Day 3 – Third Map:  Flow Map (Thinking Maps®) for Sequencing

“Quote”
– Author

Overview
The Flow Map is used for sequencing and ordering information. Sequencing is the process of identifying the relationships between stages and substages of an event (or order of numbers, operations, steps, etc.). In the outside rectangle write the name for the event, or sequence. In the larger rectangles-flowing from left to right-write in the major stages of the event. In the smaller rectangles below, write in the substages of each major stage.

On the initial use of the Flow Map, it can be with just the information above. This will be expanded when doing Community to use the Frame of Reference as well. The Frame can be used to expand with details and evidences about themselves. An example is if they write they a sequential part of their day, then can add in the frame examples of how this impacts other people. Like above, when doing the Flow Map with the Frame, and all maps and the frame, it is important the teacher models doing the map for themselves first as a model of thinking and doing.

1. Community Building with Sequencing Inductively
Participants face the inside of a large circle on their individual spots. We will then proceed to sequence in the center something we can create a sequence of in the classroom. Examples include:

• the order of our birthdays with January 1st the beginning through December 31st at the end;
• the number of siblings in the family from lowest to highest;
• the number of pets a family has;
• elicit other ideas from the students.

Begin with a small group of several students to model how they will determine the information and then put themselves in order. This can be done vocally or in silence which then inspires other ways to communicate. Debrief the students on the purpose of this community building exercises.
More on Building Community Together
More on Inductive Thinking with Visual Tools (Cognitive Processes)

2. Inductively Identifying and Sequencing the Above Community Building Exercise
As a whole class, the teacher discusses what were some of the key steps to having the students do the sequencing community builder. After the whole group discussion, have each student draw one picture (on index cards or sheets of paper) of one step they think no one else will think of. Then model with a small group of students (3-6) to silently sequence their drawings in the order of the community building exercise. Have each student share their drawing, then change anything if needed in the order. Have all the small groups do the same order of events:  sequence silently; share their drawings; re-order if necessary.
More on Inductive Thinking with Visual Tools (Cognitive Processes)

3. Collaboratively Share Daily School Things We Do (Based on the previous two days)

Click on to enlarge.

Have the students in a Think-Pair-Share format share things we do each day in class (based on this week as a focus). First a teacher models with a student; then two students; then all students; whole class share. This sets the stage for the next step of processing the sequence of a day in the classroom. This will also set the stage for taking this sequencing process to daily home events to learn more about each other.

Flow Map (Thinking Maps®) for Sequencing – Teacher Modeling
The teacher will initially model how they do a Flow Map for their day at home. This could be specific to the morning (before school), the evening (after school) and/or a weekend day (non-school day). The teacher will then model on separate pieces of paper (index card size) several things they do each day — one on each of the several (3-5) cards. The teacher will then sequence the cards in the order the home events happen. 

Flow Map (Thinking Maps®) for Sequencing – Teacher-Student Modeling
The teacher will do another Flow Map on a different part of their day (at home). This time both the teacher a student will model doing their individual papers on 3-5 events at home (morning, evening or non-school day). The teacher will model collaborating on ideas from each of their respective homes using questions to come up with ideas. When each has 3-5 cards of individual events, they will then put their respective cards in sequence. After they are both done, a protocol of a positive observation, a question, and an idea learned from their partner will be modeled.

Flow Map (Thinking Maps®) for Sequencing – Student-Student Modeling, Then All in Pairs
Following the same format as above, the teacher will start with a pair of students modeling, then pair up all in the classroom to having everyone create 3-5 cards of events in their home days (morning, evening or non-school day), then sharing with each other in pairs. After all have finished in pairs, if there is time, a gallery walk so each student can share their sequence to the whole class grows the community. 

Extension with Frame of Reference
The Frame can be added to the Flow Map to have additional information on who participates in each of the events with the student. The teacher will model theirs first.

To support the Retaining for Understanding several pathways are suggested:

• individual oral presentations reading from the maps;
• free write
• writing from a sentence pattern and/or free write extension expanding from the sentence frame (differentiation)

Presentations:  For beginning readers/writers especially with pre-k and K, the students can read their maps following their images in reading. An example is they share
‘The sequence of my day has many events.’
‘First I ________. ‘;
‘Second I ________. ‘;
‘Third I ________. ‘;
‘Fourth I ________. ‘;

When presenting each student stands, says “Hello my name is ________” or similar, then shares two things on their Thinking Map, followed by showing the map to the whole class.

Free Write:  The students write about themselves from the information on the Flow Map. It is important the teacher model strategies of writing from their personal Flow Map with the students observing. I would then have a student do the same with the class observing (either via a projection with the student’s actual writing and/or in a fishbowl setting). Then all students write. After writing I would have students read one sentence (a ‘favorite’) from their writing to the whole class. This provides affirmations and models of success.

Sentence Frame (Patterns):  Students are provides a sentence frame to write from. Writing patterns build an understanding of sentence structure in a non-threatening manner. It is important to develop ideas through patterns, visual mapping, collaborative recitation, vocabulary building, working language with a pocket chart, and writing. It will benefit the students to use words for patterns that reflect common usage (see the list of 100 and 1000 most used words in the English language). Patterns provide models of excellence while building on the brain seeking patterns. The goal is to set the stage for successful original writing.

Some simple examples include:

My day sequenced includes many things.
First I ________.
Second I ________.
Third I ________.
Fourth I ________.

First I ________ to _______.
Second I ________ because _______.
Third I ________ with _______.
Fourth I ________ for _______.

To facilitate success initially model and have students ‘read’ their maps following the flow with their fingers reading their maps orally. This is similar to the reading above with presentations with the examples: they share ‘I like ice cream’; ‘I like to go fast’; and so forth. 

Class Reflection
Share the ‘tools’ we used to develop our ideas and help our presentations and writing. Some examples they will share are the Flow Map for sequencing; Think-Pair-Share; the collaborative methods; and so forth.

Sequencing inductively: Sequencing in Silence, then Sharing Collaboratively.
Sequencing inductively: Sequencing in Silence, then Sharing Collaboratively.
Sequencing inductively: Sequencing in Silence, then Sharing Collaboratively.
Day 1: BrainstormingDay 2: QualitiesDay 3: SequencingDay 4: Cause / EffectDay 5: Categorization
The idea of doing the five maps in five days following a Pedagogical Flow Map pattern builds community though learning about ourselves together, while introducing the maps as a thinking language along with collaborative learning methods.

Day 4 – Fourth Map:  Flow Map (Thinking Maps®) for Causation (Cause and Effect)

“Quote”
– Author

Overview
The Multi-Flow Map is used for showing and analyzing cause and effect relationships. In the center rectangle, write in an important event that occurred. On the left side of the event, write in the causes of the event, and on the right side, write in the effects of the event. As you identify more causes and effects, add them to the Map. If you are studying a system, you will find that there are effects in the system that, in turn, influence initial causes. This circular cause and effect relationship is called a feedback loop.

On the initial use of the Multi-Flow Map for cause/effect, it can be with just the information above. This will be expanded when doing Community to use the Frame of Reference as well. The Frame can be used to expand with details and evidences about themselves. An example is if they have an event with the cause and effect, they can add in the frame an example of how this impacts other people. Like above, when doing the Multi-Flow Map with the Frame, and all maps and the frame, it is important the teacher models doing the map for themselves first as a model of thinking and doing.

1. Community Building with Mirroring
Participants face the inside of a large circle on their individual spots. We will then proceed to do the community building exercise of mirroring. The teacher initially leads with mirroring, then picking a student to lead, who then picks another student. In addition to empowering students to be the leaders, this provides an excellent time for the teacher, while following the lead student, to also notice the other students in the classroom. An extension in addition to whole group, is mirroring in pairs. Both the whole group and in pairs is excellent to build collaboration, observing and listening skills and developing focus. See the section on mirroring in Community Building Exercises.
More on Building Community Together

2. Commonalities
Participants face the inside of the circle on their individual spots. Today the focus is on events in our lives. The teacher leads with an important event in their life (e.g. I flew on a plane). Then anyone else that has a similar event in their lives will go across the circle. The person who just went across, picks another person to share an important event, and so forth.
More on Building Community Together

3. Collaboratively Share Important Events in Our Lives

Click on to enlarge.

A. While still in a circle, model sharing important events (teacher – student) in your lives, then two students and finally all paired up. It will be important when doing a personal Multi-Flow map to have a clear event to then build causes and effects in the Multi-Flow Map.

B. The teacher then picks an event that happens at school (e.g. lunch), draws the Multi-Flow Map on white board, large paper and/or projection. The teacher then asks what are some ’causes’ of this event. The teacher then models Pair-Share with a student on just causes of this event. The same sequence of two students modeling, then all in pairs follows. 

C. The above sequence for Pair-Share is now done for ‘effects’ with the same event.

Whole Class Multi-Flow Map
The teacher leads the whole class on a Multi-Flow Map for the event they just explored with Think-Pair-Share to model it in written (words and drawings) form. This provides a model for students to use when doing their personal events.

Individual Multi-Flow Maps
Teacher models theirs, then with a small group to model collaborating while each student in the small groups is doing their personal event Multi-Flow Map. 

Writing / Presenting the Multi-Flow Map

Day 1: BrainstormingDay 2: QualitiesDay 3: SequencingDay 4: Cause / EffectDay 5: Categorization
The idea of doing the five maps in five days following a Pedagogical Flow Map pattern builds community though learning about ourselves together, while introducing the maps as a thinking language along with collaborative learning methods.

Day 5 – Fifth Map:  Tree Map (Thinking Maps®) for Categorization

“Quote”
– Author

Overview
The Tree Map is used for classifying things and ideas. On the top line write the category name, on the second level of lines write the subcategories, and below each subcategory write the specific members. Classifying is the process of sorting things into categories or groups and creating new categories, often according to common qualities.

On the initial use of the Tree Map for classification, it can be with just the information above. This will be expanded when doing Community to use the Frame of Reference as well. The Frame can be used to expand with details and evidences about themselves. An example is if they write they categorize things about themselves, then can add in the frame an example of how this impacts other people in their family. Like above, when doing the Tree Map with the Frame, and all maps and the frame, it is important the teacher models doing the map for themselves first as a model of thinking and doing.


1. Community Building with Inductive Classification
The students will sort themselves by a particular common feature. An example could be shoes by color or type. Elicit other things they can classify themselves as well.

2. Inductively Sorting Objects
Students can use either objects from inside the classroom and/or from outside. Each student would find 4-5 objects and bring them back to their small group of 3-4 students. 
More on inductive classification

asdSDAAS

Writing / Presenting the Tree Map

INDUCTIVE VIDEO CLIPS OF STUDENTS AND EDUCATORS

Where do the Five Maps Go?! 

portfolio 

on wall

etc.